Lophophora Cristata

Lophophora Cristata

New

CT1170

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family) Scientific name: Lophophora williamsii (Lem. ex ex Salm-Dyck.) Coulter in Contrib. U.S. Nat. Herb. 3 (1894) 131. Origin: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican state of San Luís Potosí. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Habitat: Grows isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds.Lophophora williamsii, commonly known as peyote, is a small, spineless cactus native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It has been used for centuries by indigenous people for spiritual and medicinal purposes, and it is considered a sacred plant in many Native American cultures. Peyote contains several psychoactive alkaloids, including mescaline, which is responsible for its psychoactive effects. Consuming peyote can cause hallucinations, altered perceptions of time and space, and changes in mood and thought. However, it is important to note that the use of peyote is illegal in many countries, including the United States, and can be dangerous if not used in a controlled setting. In traditional Native American spiritual practices, peyote is consumed in a ceremonial context and is considered a powerful tool for inducing mystical experiences and promoting personal growth and understanding. Despite its illegal status, some indigenous communities continue to use peyote in traditional spiritual ceremonies as a means of preserving their cultural heritage and spiritual practices.

Sold 1 items

$140 $140
$99 $99 -29%
 
Out of stock

 

New

CT1090

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family) Scientific name: Lophophora williamsii (Lem. ex ex Salm-Dyck.) Coulter in Contrib. U.S. Nat. Herb. 3 (1894) 131. Origin: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican state of San Luís Potosí. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Habitat: Grows isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds.Lophophora williamsii, commonly known as peyote, is a small, spineless cactus native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It has been used for centuries by indigenous people for spiritual and medicinal purposes, and it is considered a sacred plant in many Native American cultures. Peyote contains several psychoactive alkaloids, including mescaline, which is responsible for its psychoactive effects. Consuming peyote can cause hallucinations, altered perceptions of time and space, and changes in mood and thought. However, it is important to note that the use of peyote is illegal in many countries, including the United States, and can be dangerous if not used in a controlled setting. In traditional Native American spiritual practices, peyote is consumed in a ceremonial context and is considered a powerful tool for inducing mystical experiences and promoting personal growth and understanding. Despite its illegal status, some indigenous communities continue to use peyote in traditional spiritual ceremonies as a means of preserving their cultural heritage and spiritual practices.

Sold 0 items

$500 $500
$390 $390 -22%
 

 

New

CT1089

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family) Scientific name: Lophophora williamsii (Lem. ex ex Salm-Dyck.) Coulter in Contrib. U.S. Nat. Herb. 3 (1894) 131. Origin: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican state of San Luís Potosí. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Habitat: Grows isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds.Lophophora williamsii, commonly known as peyote, is a small, spineless cactus native to the southwestern United States and Mexico. It has been used for centuries by indigenous people for spiritual and medicinal purposes, and it is considered a sacred plant in many Native American cultures. Peyote contains several psychoactive alkaloids, including mescaline, which is responsible for its psychoactive effects. Consuming peyote can cause hallucinations, altered perceptions of time and space, and changes in mood and thought. However, it is important to note that the use of peyote is illegal in many countries, including the United States, and can be dangerous if not used in a controlled setting. In traditional Native American spiritual practices, peyote is consumed in a ceremonial context and is considered a powerful tool for inducing mystical experiences and promoting personal growth and understanding. Despite its illegal status, some indigenous communities continue to use peyote in traditional spiritual ceremonies as a means of preserving their cultural heritage and spiritual practices.

Sold 0 items

$500 $500
$390 $390 -22%
 
Out of stock

 

New

CT805

Family: Cactaceae (Cactus Family) Scientific name: Lophophora williamsii (Lem. ex ex Salm-Dyck.) Coulter in Contrib. U.S. Nat. Herb. 3 (1894) 131. Origin: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican state of San Luís Potosí. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Habitat: Grows isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds.Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. More... Synonyms: Lophophora williamsii (Lem. ex Salm-Dyck) J.M.Coult. Anhalonium visnagra K.Schum. Anhalonium williamsii (Salm-Dyck) Rümpler Anhalonium williamsii Lem. ex Förster Ariocarpus williamsii (Salm-Dyck) Voss Echinocactus lewinii (Henn. ex Lewin) K.Schum. in Engl. & Prantl Echinocactus williamsii Lem. ex Salm-Dyck Echinocactus williamsii var. anhaloninicus K.Schum. Echinocactus williamsii var. pellotinicus (K.Schum.) Rouhier Mammillaria williamsii (Lem.) J.M.Coult. See all synonyms of Lophophora williamsii

Sold 1 items

$220 $220
$169 $169 -23%
 
Out of stock

 

New

CT225

Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. Common Names include: ENGLISH: Medicine of God, Devil’s root, Divine herb, Dry whiskey, Cactus pudding, Devil's-root, Diabolic-root, Divine cactus, Dry-whiskey, Dumpling cactus, Indian-dope, Mescal-buttons, Turnip cactus, Peyote, Pellote, Mescal Buttons, Whiskey cactus, White-mule BASQUE (Euskara): Peiote BULGARIAN (Български): Пейот CATALAN (Català): Peiot CHINESE (中文): 烏羽玉 CZECH (Čeština): Peyotl DANISH (Dansk): Elefantfodkaktus DUTCH (Nederlands): Peyote, Peyotl ESTONIAN (Eesti): Peioote-uimakaktus FINNISH (Suomi): Myrkkykaktus, Meskaliinikaktus FRENCH (Français): Peyotl, Peyote GALICIAN (Galego): Peyote HEBREW (עברית): פיוטה HUICHOL: Hikuri HUNGARIAN (Magyar): Peyotl, Peyote, Meszkalinkaktusz, Pejot ITALIAN (Italiano): Peyote, Mescal JAPANESE (日本語): ウバタマ, ペヨーテ KOREAN (한국어): 페요테 LATVIAN (Latviešu): Peijots LITHUANIAN (Lietuvių): Kvaitulinis pejotlis MACEDONIAN (Македонски): Пејот NAHUATL (Nāhuatl): Peyōtl NORWEGIAN (Bokmål): Peyote POLISH ( Polski): Jazgrza Williamsa PORTUGUESE (Português): Peiote RUSSIAN (Русский): Пейо́тль, Пейо́т, Лофофора Уильямса SLOVENIAN (Slovenščina): Pejotl SPANISH (Español): Peyote, Mescal SWEDISH (Svenska): Peyote TARAHUMARA: Híkuri wanamé, Híkuli wanamé Description: Lophophora williamsii is a solitary or (rarely) caespitose, spineless cactus, normally unicephalous but becoming polycephalous with age or injury, Stem: Glaucous green, dull bluish or greyish green, very succulent, globular, top-shaped, or somewhat flattened up to 6 cm tall, 12 cm diameter, with a woolly top; The subterranean portion of the stem, which is as wide as the aerial portion, extends several cm below the surface of the ground and transitions smoothly (through a thin hypocotyl) into a large

Sold 0 items

$1,200 $1,200
$600 $600 -50%
 

 

New

CT224

Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. Common Names include: ENGLISH: Medicine of God, Devil’s root, Divine herb, Dry whiskey, Cactus pudding, Devil's-root, Diabolic-root, Divine cactus, Dry-whiskey, Dumpling cactus, Indian-dope, Mescal-buttons, Turnip cactus, Peyote, Pellote, Mescal Buttons, Whiskey cactus, White-mule BASQUE (Euskara): Peiote BULGARIAN (Български): Пейот CATALAN (Català): Peiot CHINESE (中文): 烏羽玉 CZECH (Čeština): Peyotl DANISH (Dansk): Elefantfodkaktus DUTCH (Nederlands): Peyote, Peyotl ESTONIAN (Eesti): Peioote-uimakaktus FINNISH (Suomi): Myrkkykaktus, Meskaliinikaktus FRENCH (Français): Peyotl, Peyote GALICIAN (Galego): Peyote HEBREW (עברית): פיוטה HUICHOL: Hikuri HUNGARIAN (Magyar): Peyotl, Peyote, Meszkalinkaktusz, Pejot ITALIAN (Italiano): Peyote, Mescal JAPANESE (日本語): ウバタマ, ペヨーテ KOREAN (한국어): 페요테 LATVIAN (Latviešu): Peijots LITHUANIAN (Lietuvių): Kvaitulinis pejotlis MACEDONIAN (Македонски): Пејот NAHUATL (Nāhuatl): Peyōtl NORWEGIAN (Bokmål): Peyote POLISH ( Polski): Jazgrza Williamsa PORTUGUESE (Português): Peiote RUSSIAN (Русский): Пейо́тль, Пейо́т, Лофофора Уильямса SLOVENIAN (Slovenščina): Pejotl SPANISH (Español): Peyote, Mescal SWEDISH (Svenska): Peyote TARAHUMARA: Híkuri wanamé, Híkuli wanamé Description: Lophophora williamsii is a solitary or (rarely) caespitose, spineless cactus, normally unicephalous but becoming polycephalous with age or injury, Stem: Glaucous green, dull bluish or greyish green, very succulent, globular, top-shaped, or somewhat flattened up to 6 cm tall, 12 cm diameter, with a woolly top; The subterranean portion of the stem, which is as wide as the aerial portion, extends several cm below the surface of the ground and transitions smoothly (through a thin hypocotyl) into a large

Sold 0 items

$600 $600
$315 $315 -48%
 

 

New

CT222

Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. Common Names include: ENGLISH: Medicine of God, Devil’s root, Divine herb, Dry whiskey, Cactus pudding, Devil's-root, Diabolic-root, Divine cactus, Dry-whiskey, Dumpling cactus, Indian-dope, Mescal-buttons, Turnip cactus, Peyote, Pellote, Mescal Buttons, Whiskey cactus, White-mule BASQUE (Euskara): Peiote BULGARIAN (Български): Пейот CATALAN (Català): Peiot CHINESE (中文): 烏羽玉 CZECH (Čeština): Peyotl DANISH (Dansk): Elefantfodkaktus DUTCH (Nederlands): Peyote, Peyotl ESTONIAN (Eesti): Peioote-uimakaktus FINNISH (Suomi): Myrkkykaktus, Meskaliinikaktus FRENCH (Français): Peyotl, Peyote GALICIAN (Galego): Peyote HEBREW (עברית): פיוטה HUICHOL: Hikuri HUNGARIAN (Magyar): Peyotl, Peyote, Meszkalinkaktusz, Pejot ITALIAN (Italiano): Peyote, Mescal JAPANESE (日本語): ウバタマ, ペヨーテ KOREAN (한국어): 페요테 LATVIAN (Latviešu): Peijots LITHUANIAN (Lietuvių): Kvaitulinis pejotlis MACEDONIAN (Македонски): Пејот NAHUATL (Nāhuatl): Peyōtl NORWEGIAN (Bokmål): Peyote POLISH ( Polski): Jazgrza Williamsa PORTUGUESE (Português): Peiote RUSSIAN (Русский): Пейо́тль, Пейо́т, Лофофора Уильямса SLOVENIAN (Slovenščina): Pejotl SPANISH (Español): Peyote, Mescal SWEDISH (Svenska): Peyote TARAHUMARA: Híkuri wanamé, Híkuli wanamé Description: Lophophora williamsii is a solitary or (rarely) caespitose, spineless cactus, normally unicephalous but becoming polycephalous with age or injury, Stem: Glaucous green, dull bluish or greyish green, very succulent, globular, top-shaped, or somewhat flattened up to 6 cm tall, 12 cm diameter, with a woolly top; The subterranean portion of the stem, which is as wide as the aerial portion, extends several cm below the surface of the ground and transitions smoothly (through a thin hypocotyl) into a large

Sold 0 items

$900 $900
$300 $300 -67%
 
Out of stock

 

New

CT218

Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. Common Names include: ENGLISH: Medicine of God, Devil’s root, Divine herb, Dry whiskey, Cactus pudding, Devil's-root, Diabolic-root, Divine cactus, Dry-whiskey, Dumpling cactus, Indian-dope, Mescal-buttons, Turnip cactus, Peyote, Pellote, Mescal Buttons, Whiskey cactus, White-mule BASQUE (Euskara): Peiote BULGARIAN (Български): Пейот CATALAN (Català): Peiot CHINESE (中文): 烏羽玉 CZECH (Čeština): Peyotl DANISH (Dansk): Elefantfodkaktus DUTCH (Nederlands): Peyote, Peyotl ESTONIAN (Eesti): Peioote-uimakaktus FINNISH (Suomi): Myrkkykaktus, Meskaliinikaktus FRENCH (Français): Peyotl, Peyote GALICIAN (Galego): Peyote HEBREW (עברית): פיוטה HUICHOL: Hikuri HUNGARIAN (Magyar): Peyotl, Peyote, Meszkalinkaktusz, Pejot ITALIAN (Italiano): Peyote, Mescal JAPANESE (日本語): ウバタマ, ペヨーテ KOREAN (한국어): 페요테 LATVIAN (Latviešu): Peijots LITHUANIAN (Lietuvių): Kvaitulinis pejotlis MACEDONIAN (Македонски): Пејот NAHUATL (Nāhuatl): Peyōtl NORWEGIAN (Bokmål): Peyote POLISH ( Polski): Jazgrza Williamsa PORTUGUESE (Português): Peiote RUSSIAN (Русский): Пейо́тль, Пейо́т, Лофофора Уильямса SLOVENIAN (Slovenščina): Pejotl SPANISH (Español): Peyote, Mescal SWEDISH (Svenska): Peyote TARAHUMARA: Híkuri wanamé, Híkuli wanamé Description: Lophophora williamsii is a solitary or (rarely) caespitose, spineless cactus, normally unicephalous but becoming polycephalous with age or injury, Stem: Glaucous green, dull bluish or greyish green, very succulent, globular, top-shaped, or somewhat flattened up to 6 cm tall, 12 cm diameter, with a woolly top; The subterranean portion of the stem, which is as wide as the aerial portion, extends several cm below the surface of the ground and transitions smoothly (through a thin hypocotyl) into a large

Sold 1 items

$400 $400
$200 $200 -50%
 
Out of stock

 

New

CT205

Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. Common Names include: ENGLISH: Medicine of God, Devil’s root, Divine herb, Dry whiskey, Cactus pudding, Devil's-root, Diabolic-root, Divine cactus, Dry-whiskey, Dumpling cactus, Indian-dope, Mescal-buttons, Turnip cactus, Peyote, Pellote, Mescal Buttons, Whiskey cactus, White-mule BASQUE (Euskara): Peiote BULGARIAN (Български): Пейот CATALAN (Català): Peiot CHINESE (中文): 烏羽玉 CZECH (Čeština): Peyotl DANISH (Dansk): Elefantfodkaktus DUTCH (Nederlands): Peyote, Peyotl ESTONIAN (Eesti): Peioote-uimakaktus FINNISH (Suomi): Myrkkykaktus, Meskaliinikaktus FRENCH (Français): Peyotl, Peyote GALICIAN (Galego): Peyote HEBREW (עברית): פיוטה HUICHOL: Hikuri HUNGARIAN (Magyar): Peyotl, Peyote, Meszkalinkaktusz, Pejot ITALIAN (Italiano): Peyote, Mescal JAPANESE (日本語): ウバタマ, ペヨーテ KOREAN (한국어): 페요테 LATVIAN (Latviešu): Peijots LITHUANIAN (Lietuvių): Kvaitulinis pejotlis MACEDONIAN (Македонски): Пејот NAHUATL (Nāhuatl): Peyōtl NORWEGIAN (Bokmål): Peyote POLISH ( Polski): Jazgrza Williamsa PORTUGUESE (Português): Peiote RUSSIAN (Русский): Пейо́тль, Пейо́т, Лофофора Уильямса SLOVENIAN (Slovenščina): Pejotl SPANISH (Español): Peyote, Mescal SWEDISH (Svenska): Peyote TARAHUMARA: Híkuri wanamé, Híkuli wanamé Description: Lophophora williamsii is a solitary or (rarely) caespitose, spineless cactus, normally unicephalous but becoming polycephalous with age or injury, Stem: Glaucous green, dull bluish or greyish green, very succulent, globular, top-shaped, or somewhat flattened up to 6 cm tall, 12 cm diameter, with a woolly top; The subterranean portion of the stem, which is as wide as the aerial portion, extends several cm below the surface of the ground and transitions smoothly (through a thin hypocotyl) into a large

Sold 0 items

$2,000 $2,000
$700 $700 -65%
 
Out of stock

 

New

CT202

Origin and Habitat: Grows in an area that stretches from from the Chihuahuan Desert to the South Texas Plains, on either side of the middle and lower Rio Grande River, southward to the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Durango, Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, Zacatecas. Extensive stands of peyote occur on the low, rocky hills in Starr, Zapata, Webb, and Jim Hogg counties of southern Texas. Altitude: It grows from 100 up to 1900 metres above sea level. Habitat and Ecology: This geophytic, button-like cactus occurs in xerophyllous scrub including Tamaulipan thorn scrub isolated or in groups usually in calcareous deserts, on rocky slopes, or in dried river beds. The species is very abundant in habitat with large number of mature individuals however many subpopulations of Lophophora williamsii are heavily harvested in the wild throughout the range of the species, some to the point of extirpation. In Mexico, collection is illegal and people are punished for collecting it. Land use change for agriculture is a significant threat, as the land is completely ploughed, thus eliminating all vegetation including L. williamsii and its seed bank. Common Names include: ENGLISH: Medicine of God, Devil’s root, Divine herb, Dry whiskey, Cactus pudding, Devil's-root, Diabolic-root, Divine cactus, Dry-whiskey, Dumpling cactus, Indian-dope, Mescal-buttons, Turnip cactus, Peyote, Pellote, Mescal Buttons, Whiskey cactus, White-mule BASQUE (Euskara): Peiote BULGARIAN (Български): Пейот CATALAN (Català): Peiot CHINESE (中文): 烏羽玉 CZECH (Čeština): Peyotl DANISH (Dansk): Elefantfodkaktus DUTCH (Nederlands): Peyote, Peyotl ESTONIAN (Eesti): Peioote-uimakaktus FINNISH (Suomi): Myrkkykaktus, Meskaliinikaktus FRENCH (Français): Peyotl, Peyote GALICIAN (Galego): Peyote HEBREW (עברית): פיוטה HUICHOL: Hikuri HUNGARIAN (Magyar): Peyotl, Peyote, Meszkalinkaktusz, Pejot ITALIAN (Italiano): Peyote, Mescal JAPANESE (日本語): ウバタマ, ペヨーテ KOREAN (한국어): 페요테 LATVIAN (Latviešu): Peijots LITHUANIAN (Lietuvių): Kvaitulinis pejotlis MACEDONIAN (Македонски): Пејот NAHUATL (Nāhuatl): Peyōtl NORWEGIAN (Bokmål): Peyote POLISH ( Polski): Jazgrza Williamsa PORTUGUESE (Português): Peiote RUSSIAN (Русский): Пейо́тль, Пейо́т, Лофофора Уильямса SLOVENIAN (Slovenščina): Pejotl SPANISH (Español): Peyote, Mescal SWEDISH (Svenska): Peyote TARAHUMARA: Híkuri wanamé, Híkuli wanamé Description: Lophophora williamsii is a solitary or (rarely) caespitose, spineless cactus, normally unicephalous but becoming polycephalous with age or injury, Stem: Glaucous green, dull bluish or greyish green, very succulent, globular, top-shaped, or somewhat flattened up to 6 cm tall, 12 cm diameter, with a woolly top; The subterranean portion of the stem, which is as wide as the aerial portion, extends several cm below the surface of the ground and transitions smoothly (through a thin hypocotyl) into a large

Sold 0 items

$2,000 $2,000
$700 $700 -65%
 

 

New

CT063

Description: The Latin word "Caespitosa" means “growing in tufts”” or “densely-clumped”, refers to the dense tufts of stems. This name is used to indicate a number of clones of horticultural origin characterized by a more or less accentuated production of axillary shoots that in age grow and form huge cushions. The plants called “caespitosa” are vegetatively reproduced and are often hybrid. Remarks: In the wild habitat solitary and clumping plants are both present and It is not a rare event to find a caespitose seedling in the seedling tray among the more common single headed plants. Some of the caespitose clones produce dozens (or hundreds) of very small shoots each of them never reach the dimension of a flowering plant, thus they are sterile and can be reproduced exclusively by cuttings. Other clones have bigger heads and can produce flowers and seeds. Cultivation and Propagation: Slow growing. Because of the tap root they are very rot prone, so use highly gritty compost with much drainage. Requires half shade to part sun. Watering: waterings should be rather infrequent to keep the plant compact and not to become excessively elongated and unnatural in appearance, watering it properly is often difficult because this plant tends to crack open or rot if over-watered. The fact that the plant retracts into the soil and assume a grey-green colouring between watering, is perfectly natural and doesn’t cause any damage. Overwatering: Keep completely dry and cool in winter (An unheated greenhouse would be perfect) or when night temperatures remain below 10° C, it can survive low temperatures (appr. -7°C) for a short period. Assure a good ventilation. Propagation: Easy to propagate from cuttings in spring (let them dry till the ends callous well). Then replant them in fresh cactus soil that is ever so slightly moist, and keep them that way till they root.

Sold 5 items

$249 $249
$199 $199 -20%
 

 

CT015

lophophora williamsii 110 usd1.I accept PayPal2.ship to worldwide#cactus #cactaceae #plant #lophophora #sellcactus #buycactus #selllophophora #succulent #agave#cactuslover#astrophyum#cactuscollection#cactusthailand#cacti#succulove#cactuslove#gymnocalycium#beautiful#cactusflowers

Sold 6 items

$1,630 $1,630
$650 $650 -60%
 

 

Powered by MakeWebEasy.com
This website uses cookies for best user experience, to find out more you can go to our Privacy Policy  and  Cookies Policy